The Ages-Old Tree & The Airborne Visionary (guest post)

looking up into a very tall tree

The Ages-Old Tree

by Mary Beth Rueger, age 17

Outside of my house,
Close to the red door,
Sits an ages-old tree
with leaves a million and more.

Each leaf is a whisper,
A thought, or a dream
that’s been stored in the trunk
Of that ages-old tree.

The tree hears each thought
And every kind word.
It grows every time
A good lesson is learned.

It stores all the good
And purges the bad
To tell him who enters
My house to be glad.

That ages-old tree
Sings a lesson for all:
“Forgiveness is simple
In matters great and small.”

“But though it is simple,”
Says the tree’s lovely song,
“It is not always easy
To forgive when you’re wronged.

“Just look to the Maker,
And He will empower,
For He is there to help
In your most bitter hour.”

The ages-old tree
Sends its song on the breeze
To calm angry hearts
And to bitter minds ease.

So to you, friends, I say,
“Forgive one another,
For the Lord our God demands
That we each love our brother.”


The Airborne Visionary

by Mary Beth Rueger, age 17

Igor Sikorsky was a Russian aircraft designer. While he did start his career designing fixed airfoil aircraft, more commonly known as airplanes, Sikorsky had always wanted to design a helicopter. By 1910, Sikorsky had developed two rotary airfoil aircraft, but the engines were not strong enough for liftoff. Even after he solved this problem, there was another issue to be addressed.

In early designs of helicopters, flight stability was a problem. When more power was applied to the rotors, the body of the helicopter would rotate on its y-axis. Two methods of combating this issue were developed in 1936 and 1939, but both had their drawbacks. Sikorsky developed the idea of a small tail rotor, the design of which is used today, and in 1941 he perfected his design.

In late 1941, Sikorsky designed the VS-300A, which is seen as the forerunner of modern helicopters. It took Sikorsky over 30 years to design and perfect an aircraft that met his goal of creating something that could be used to rescue those in need.


About the Author

Both the poem and the essay above were written by my daughter, Mary Beth, a few months ago. I am sharing them with you today as part of our celebration of her high school graduation. In the fall she plans to attend a Christian college and major in Professional Writing, with a proficiency in Creative Writing.

 

Photos taken in Chesapeake, VA, 2009

 

 

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